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10 new curators – Trii Hub Gallery

Curated:  by Olga Latousaki

If dreams could be imprinted on canvas, they would certainly look a lot like Stamatakis’ new work. Like old photographs from a distant past, his art looks mysteriously familiar to the viewer’s eye. Deeply influenced by the romantic movement and using his representative colors, he captures undefinable memories, adopting, in a modernistic way, his own, sensitive viewpoint into the subconscious.

Documenta 14/Elective Affinities ASFA and open studios

Coordinator: Arnisa Zego

What kind of book is this ?

In August 1948, at a radio show, Mister John Hayward said that Eliot’s poem Waste Land, is not about a real girl but the sculpture of a girl, who Eliot searched in vain at a museum in Italy. If this is true, what difference does it make to us? To the story?

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Everything around us tells a story. As an artist, you have to choose which one to tell, and then how you are going to tell it.

In this small scale wall-mounted installation, I chose to interact with both my literary and artistic inspirations. I am borrowing Goya’s palette of colours and some of his earlier painting techniques and I use the poem Waste Land by T.S Eliot to breathe life to the symbols and meaning in each of these seven works- which in reality, can only be seen as One.

The idea of Ulises Carrión, a Mexican artist who used painters’ notebooks as works of art that can stand by themselves, and my close interaction with his work during Documenta 14 in Athens -in which I was part of the education programme (team elective affinities)- has helped me to formulate better my idea of using blocks of wood which are shaped like books as my canvases. Also, a show that took place in EleftheriaTseliouGallery in Athens based on David Sampethai’sidea, had the same concept: Notebooks by artists, which can stand as their own artworks. The notebooks included paintings, scribbles, ideas and, in general, the mind of each artist in progress.

The purpose is to explore the ways in which the medium an artists chooses to interact with might potentially confine his creativity and artistic exoression. The representative image that the audience seeks a meaning from, is not always the preferable way of the creator. The book-blocks here, are used in order to capture that fleeting moment when a story leaves the creator and becomes part of something else. It becomes, everyone’s story.

This journey, from the protected environment of the artist’s house (here the word house stands for the environment the artist creates in) to the violent presentation to the public eye, is what I am asked to answer, and I can only answer it with another question, which stands up gargantuan.

Can the security of the allowed madness an artist can go to in order to create be transferred purely to the opinionated audience, which will, most definitely, translate it to their own personal meaning? If so, what is the obligation of the artist relating to his artwork?

 

Integral II

Curated by: Ileana Tounta, Galini Lazani,DimitriosAntonitsis

Integral II is the second part of the exhibition presented at the Ileana TountaContemporary Art Center in April 2017. Both shows refer to the current socio-political reality, not only in our country but also in the whole world, through the presentation of artworks by Greek artists of an earlier generation, in dialogue with the work of younger artists.

The internationally acclaimed artists JannisKounellis, George Lappasand Lucas Samaras always created works that derived from personal and political turmoil. The curators of the exhibition chose the most discerning of them to comment on the present dark atmosphere, result of the social and political situation.

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JannisKounellis’ imposing metallic installation with burlap sacks full of charcoal is a classic example of how he perceived art, as a means of social, political and humanitarian commentary. George Lappas, with his “headless / dislocated” traveler, and Lucas Samaras with Reconstructions – works which bring to mind traditional burial customs – accomplish the same commentary. However, Lappasdraws his inspiration from his experiences as a perpetual refugee and Samaras from his deep mourning for a family member.

Accordingly, the works of the young artists of the exhibition express with sharpness and clarity insightful ideas, despite the harsh conditions in which they were created. By selecting these specific works, the curators of the exhibition attempt to emphasize that contemporary artistic expression does not suffer, but that, on the contrary, in times of crisis art is called upon to adopt a wider look and to constantly invent new ways and new sources of creation.

Dimitris Andreadis, with his painting installations, depicts the light that can originate from the void, while, with similar sensitivity, George Stamatakis and Katerina Kotsalarefer to a blending and alternation of places and landscapes. The description in Kotsala’swork is developed by thematic deductions in which cold color pallets are leading, while in Stamatakis’ canvases we encounter dreary, yet hopeful narratives.

Dimitris Foutrisexpresses the same hopeful ideas in a more conceptual way: the indisputable continuity of things and the belief that nothing ever dies out completely, without leaving traces. Kostas Bassanosalso presents an oxymoron, in the form of confusion and optimism at the same time, which arises from conditions of trapping, but also from a possibility of expanding / collapsing the limits caused by the sense of imperfection.

Andreas Lolisoverwhelms us with marble sculptural hallucinations, where everyday compositions put together by low value objects acquire a monumental nature. In the same way, Socrates Fatourosuses multiple layers of building materials of the modern city (bitumen sheets, polyurethane) as remnants and reminders of our initial experience in it. Katerina Komianou, as a post-romantic urban explorer, a modern flanneuse, proposes a night scenery with prominent public space statues and dried palm trees – remnants of decorating the recent Olympic grandeur.

Dimitris Baboulis, while maintaining a shady content, works with clear-cut lines and shapes that refer to geometric and scientific practices, without unnecessary elements, expressing a purely personal consciousness level.

It is a distinctive feature of the new generation of Greek artists to dare and constantly battle with originality. They use in their art the repository of the modern civilization of our country and attempt to reconstruct it, in order to comment on today’s everyday life.

As Oscar Wilde quoted, we are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars…

Participating artists:

Dimitris Andreadis, Dimitris Baboulis, Kostas Bassanos, Socrates Fatouros, Dimitris Foutris, Katerina Komianou, Katerina Kotsala,JannisKounellis, George Lappas, Andreas Lolis, Lucas Samaras, George Stamatakis

 

 

 

Shopping point – Daily Lazy project (Gallery)

Curated by:  Kostis Velonis
Assistant Curator:  FaidraVasileiadou

 

Antoine Tudal, Paris enl’an2000

In erotic literature, we often find descriptions of the impasse of a relationship based on sexual difference. The exhibition takes as its point of departure a poem by Antoine Tudal, Paris enl’an2000, which describes the difficulty of love through the acoustic and verbal similarity of “love” (l’amour) and “wall” (le mur) in French.

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However, Jacques Lacan’s reference to the poem as a semiology of difference and similarity provides a basis in order to justify the relationship through the two lovers’ blunders and fumbles, their vain and unfulfilled reveries, even through excruciating pain (la douleurexquise) that turns into tragicomedy when there is no mutual response.

The exhibition reveals what pushes away instead of uniting, what stands as an obstacle and makes relationships incompatible uniting instead of pushes away. Archaic and biblical references about the eternal battle of sexes, as well as the rhetoric of contemporary psychology on “complementary” relationship, become the ingredients of an indirect acceptance of the separation caused by biological difference.

The emergence of divergence between desire and the obstacle that annuls it conveys the comical or melancholic outcome of an event that echoes not just the division of the relationship, but also the conflict, the struggle and the effort surrounding it. Here, there may be winners and losers, but in reality both sides annihilate each other, since idealizations and erotic frenzies are altered and extinguished in the corrosive flow of time.

In perceiving the wordplay of l’a-muras an insurmountable “love-wall”, or even as a temporarily surmountable obstacle, the exhibition aims at parodying discontinuity in this libidinal architecture of delimitation and cut.

THE TROJANS – Benaki Museum – support of EMST & NEON

Forty naked human bodies packed in a sterilized space resembling a crematorium, a morgue, a place for storing meat∙ bodies exposed to risk. A room full of mouths reproducing excerpts from political speeches and prophecies confirmed or disproved by History. Ten performers –souls trapped in an arid place, using every means possible, even silence, to bring forth wounds acquired from their personal or ancestral involuntary translocations, discussing the concepts of citizenship, nationality and “belonging”.

 

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It is a fleeing picture of the universe of a multidimensional performance/ installation, conceived by actress and director Rafika Sauis and creative artist Michalis Argyros, titled “Anima Captus-Trojan women”. The 96-hour performance is taking place inside a labyrinthine structure people can visit in the New Benaki Museum, where it will be housed.

Reference to Euripides’ drama “Trojan Women” is inevitable, since the unsurpassed work of ancient Greek Literature is about war and persecuted people.

In a lengthy performance focused on the notion of the” geographic scar”, the artists use their bodies to participate in a stasimon of “Trojan women”.

In this work the spectator is following a four day-long interactive route. The ten main performers, originating from Greece, Afganistan, Syria and Iran will be living inside the museum, in total silence, for four days. However, people can visit the installation only during the museum’s opening hours.